Tag Archives: wild turkey

All dressed with somewhere to go

 

Turkey

Jason poses with his first wild turkey taken on a morning hunt with the turkey taken by his friend Nick alongside.

Wild turkey hunting is something my hunting buddies and I want to take part in very much. I attended the seminar would be turkey hunters in Ontario are required to complete to get licensed several years ago. With a hunting buddy, I had at the time I travelled extensively in Eastern Ontario, knocking on doors in a futile effort to secure access to a property that held wild turkeys. The most common reasons given when we were refused access were that others already hunted the property or the landowner did not permit hunting. My enthusiasm for wild turkey hunting waned in the intervening years–though my current hunting buddies and I had access to the farmland where we deer hunt to hunt wild turkeys until recently. There are turkeys on the farm; I remember seeing turkeys while seated in my deer stand during deer season. Val, the owner of the farm and our gracious hostess, developed a sentimental attachment to the turkeys as they frequent her bird feeder. She asked that we do not hunt them and we respect her wishes. You could say, regarding turkey hunting, my buddies and I are “all dressed with nowhere to go.” However, fortune turned in our favour this season as one of our number, my buddy Jason, succeeded in bagging his first wild turkey in an exciting hunt Continue reading

Trial, error and a nine point buck in the bag

ninepoint

My first white-tailed buck, a nine point, taken on opening afternoon of the 2016 rifle season in Eastern Ontario.

I never fully appreciated big game hunting until I shot my first white-tailed buck yesterday afternoon on the opening day of the 2016 rifle season here in Eastern Ontario. I took up big game hunting in earnest in 2011 under the tutelage of my good friend and hunting buddy Jason Quinn. Jay is an accomplished big game hunter with a lifetime of experience in the pursuit of white-tailed deer, moose and black bear. Under his guidance I shot my first white-tailed deer, a doe, in the 2012 rifle season. While killing my first deer was a thrill in its own right, the hunt I experienced yesterday was the culmination of all that is good in hunting: notably the challenges, camaraderie , effort, joys, sorrows and sportsmanship associated with hunting. The buck, my first, was hunted down and killed in a fair chase. I felled it using my Browning X-Bold Medallion bolt action rifle (left-hand) in 30-06 with a Winchester Super X 150 grain bullet. What this experience showed is I remain a novice deer hunter and with Jay as friend and mentor I am learning through trial and error.

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Cock up!

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Grouse and woodcock taken over Hera’s points on Opening Day of Woodcock season 2016.

Cock up! This is the cry that goes out during a driven grouse shoot in England when the beaters flush a woodcock. This was in the back of my mind as I got out with Hera this morning for the opening of woodcock season 2016 hoping we would turn up some birds. We were on the road shortly after 0700 bound for the Marlborough Forest. The weather was near perfect for upland gunning: sunny, cool (hovering near 0 degrees C) and virtually no wind. This was my first hunt with the new Franchi Instinct SL o/u in 20 gauge I acquired in August. I have it choked with skeet and skeet tubes as most shots at grouse and woodcock are at close range. I stopped for a coffee and apple fritter en route and remembered as we drove along Prince of Wales Drive I forgot to bring water for us to drink. I stopped at an Ultramar station and bought a bottle. I expected the forest would be drier than I would like, given the drought we endured over the summer months. We had some rainfall in the weeks leading up to our hunt this morning and I tried to remain optimistic, but feared the lowland bogs that hold woodcock would be dry. As we neared the forest, my fears were justified. Two of the streams that cross Roger Stevens Road were dry. A patch of swampland at the edge of the forest still held water, but it was much lower than usual. Undaunted, I pressed on and as it turned out, Hera and I had a good morning in the field.

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