Tag Archives: skeet shooting

Don’t call me surly!

 

James

James breaking a clay on the trap range.

I got out to the Stittsville Shooting Ranges with my new friend and hunting buddy James Burnside. We met at the range at noon; it was our first meeting in person. I like to go to the range with new hunting buddies to get acquainted. I like to see how they conduct themselves on the shooting range and show them that I am experienced and safety-conscious in handling firearms. I went to sign in, pay for four rounds of skeet shooting, and purchase four boxes of 20 gauge ammunition. I brought my Franchi Instinct SL in 20 gauge. I had the skeet and skeet choke tubes installed. James went to his car to retrieve his Remington 870 Express pump-action gun in 12 gauge. The skeet range was free so, we walked on to the field with our shotguns, ammunition, and my camcorder on its tripod. As I placed my gun on the rack next to the first shooting station, James advised me that a man standing with a couple of his shooting buddies had concerns about the camcorder. Continue reading

My Jamaican Hunting Buddies

My hunting buddy Doug Hopwood (who is from Jamaica) contacted me and asked if I would join him, his brother Andrew and their father Martin (who were in town visiting Doug and his family) for some skeet shooting at Stittsville Shooting Range on Sunday August 7th. I happily accepted his invitation. I brought my 20 gauge Winchester side-by-side and my Browning O/U. The Winchester is one of my upland guns as is the Browning. I brought the Browning for Andrew to use on this trip to the shooting range. Doug brought his Remington Model 1187 autoloader and shared it with his father. Doug’s father and brother gun for doves back home in Jamaica and the season was due to open later in August. It was a great opportunity to get out for some target practice, to shake off the cobwebs, before dove season in Jamaica and woodcock season here in the Ottawa Valley come October. Andrew shot very well with my Browning. Doug and his father shot well also. As for me, I hit an appreciable number of the clays, but the cobwebs are a little thicker on me. Here are some highlights from our trip to the range.

Posted by Geoffrey

To hit is history. To miss is mystery. — Shirley E. Woods, Jr.

In a lifetime of shooting with shotguns I can safely say I am a fair wing shot on the target range and a good wing shot in the field. I consistently hit a fair number of clays on the skeet range, stations 3-5 give me the most difficulty and I do not bother with station 8 as for me is is just shooting the air full of holes. In the field, with my hunting buddies, I usually limit out on Canada geese in gunning over land and water. In the uplands I do very well gunning for woodcock, though this has a great deal to do with having an exceptional gun dog to find and point the birds for me. This sets me up for the shot and as woodcock are consistent in towering when flushed, always heading for the open sky, I usually find the mark, though often with a quick follow up shot with my Winchester 20 gauge side-by-side double barrelled gun. The reality is you are not going to hit every target you shoot at, be it a clay bird on the skeet range or a game bird in the field. I have racked up a great number of spectacular misses, both on the skeet range and in the field, over the years as my hunting buddies can attest. Missing when you are shooting with a shotgun comes with the territory, but therein lies the fun that comes from shotgunning. If you hit every target you would quickly grow tired of the sport. Continue reading