Tag Archives: Canada goose hunting

Goose egg? Nah!

8 Canada geese and 2 wood ducks taken on an October morning.

8 Canada geese and 2 wood ducks taken on an October morning.

It is Thanksgiving weekend here in Canada. We celebrate Thanksgiving in October up here and it is not as big an event as in the United States. More often than not Thanksgiving weekend coincides with the harvest of soybeans in Eastern Ontario and the arrival of the  northern flight of migrating Canada geese. We got word from the land owner that his soybean fields were scheduled for harvest a couple of days before the holiday weekend. Just to be sure, I asked my hunting buddy Omer to take a drive out the Thursday before to see if the harvest was carried out. He went to see and reported, yes, the fields were harvested. With this established I made plans with another hunting buddy, Jason, to get out for a Canada goose hunt the coming Saturday morning. Omer and his new friend Ehtisham completed our hunting party. This was Sean’s first Canada goose hunt so we were hopeful we would get into some geese on the freshly harvested fields.

I took Thursday and Friday off to get out hunting with my Brittany Hera. We got out to the Marlborough Forest in pursuit of grouse and woodcock. What I saw, or did not see, while we were chasing grouse and woodcock was high flying flocks of migrating Canada geese. This is usually what you expect to see at this time of year. It is an indication that the northern flight is moving into the region. I was a little concerned we might find geese scarce come Saturday morning as a result, but did not let this dampen my enthusiasm for the hunt.

We planned to meet on the selected bean field at 5:00 am Saturday morning. The evening before I helped Jason load his truck with my two dozen full-bodied Higdon Canada goose decoys, his two dozen Higdon shell decoys, his layout blinds and the crate to carry his dog, Nos. Back at my house, I loaded my layout blind, burlap to conceal the camcorders and several of my Carrylite Canada goose floaters. We use goose floaters in the decoy spread as they resemble geese resting on the field.  I set my alarm for 3:00 am and was promptly awakened in due course. I had a quick breakfast, loaded my shotgun, shells and cameras into the car and was on the road by 4:00 am. I stopped en route at a Tim Hortons to fill my thermos with black coffee and arrived at the field before everyone else at 4:30. I drove out onto the field searching for a suitable spot to set up, finding a decent looking spot in the middle of the field. There was plenty of chaff and waste beans on the field, plenty for hungry Canada geese to feed on.

Jason camouflaging his layout blind.

Jason camouflaging his layout blind.

Jason drove up just before 5:00 am with Omer and Ehtisham close behind. We got to work at once, unloading the decoys and layout blinds. We started with the layout blinds, placing them on the field and weaving chaff into the them to conceal them. If you want Canada geese to decoy, you have to make your blind look as though it is part of the field.  Once that was done we got to work putting the decoys on their stands and setting them out in what we wanted to look like a flock of Canada geese happily feeding and resting on the freshly cut bean field. Assembling the full-bodied and shell decoys took a little longer than we anticipated. Next time we get out goose hunting we will allow ourselves more time. We had the decoys set just in time for legal shooting time at 6:42 am. I was setting up one of the camcorders when minutes into shooting time a flock of wood ducks winged in, landing in the decoys. Jason, having just loaded his shotgun, flushed the ducks and doubled. Nos retrieved the downed wood ducks as I finished setting the camcorders, then we got into our blinds and waited for the geese to start their morning flight.

About one hour into shooting time a flock approached our decoy spread, they looked interested, but flared. The birds flew behind our blinds and one of their number saw fit to land in the decoys. We waited and watched, hoping more would follow suit, but they continued on their way. As I suspected, these were not newly arrived birds migrating from their northern range. We watched as the goose that landed took off and got away unharmed. These were local birds who experienced many decoy spreads and goose hunters trying to conceal themselves and long discovered fields where they can feed and rest without getting shot at. We realized that this morning shooting would be at passing flocks, pairs and singles that approached close enough for a shot. As the morning wore on we saw lots more geese, but most were on their way somewhere else, showing no interest in our field. However, Ehtisham got his first goose when a single approached the decoy spread from 12 o’clock well within range. Sean dumped the bird cleanly with one shot and Nos made the retrieve.

I racked up a spectacular miss on a passing flock, but Jason and Omer knocked down three birds. Later on Jason downed a single and one addled goose landed in the decoys only to be run down by Nos who gets credit for the kill. Later on I dumped another goose approaching the spread from 12 o’clock with one shot. It is my second kill using improved steel shot and I was duly impressed. We stayed on the field until 11:30 am and at about 11:20 am we heard the familiar honk of a lone goose behind us. I sent out a series of excited honks and clucks on my goose call and the bird came winging in, offering Omer and Jason a shot as it quartered in front of them. It was downed cleanly and on that note we called it a day. We had eight Canada geese and two wood ducks in the bag, including Ehtisham’s first goose. Given the fact we were gunning local birds wary of decoy spreads and blinds, we did very well.

Ehtisham on his first Canada goose hunt.

Ehtisham on his first Canada goose hunt.

Posted by Geoffrey

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Situation normal, all fowled up

Goldeneyeduckboat

For day four of the rifle season for deer, November 6, 2014, Omer and I opted for a duck hunt on the Tay River. I saw goldeneyes on the Rideau River while running my dog Hera earlier in the week and hoped we would find some on the Tay, a goldeneye hotspot for us in seasons past. I was up at 3:00 am, having breakfast and loading my cameras, shotgun and shells–the last items I load in my SUV before setting out–and made my way to the garage where I store my boat and trailer. I arrived there in good time, the plan was for Omer to meet me there at 4:00 am and we would make our way together to the Tay River, which is about one hour’s drive from the city. Omer was running late, so we met up en route and continued on to the edge of the Tay River, shortly after 5:00 am, still in good time. Legal shooting time started at 6:20 am. This allowed us time to make our way to our site and set out the decoys with time to spare. So far so good it was, but what followed is a hunt that will live on in ignominy. Continue reading

From buck fever to a wild goose chase

buckfeverWild_goose_chase_by_lipsmack911

The first week of the rifle season in the area near Spencerville, Ontario where my hunting buddies and I sit in our stands during the deer season is over. What a week it was. We hunt on the farm of friends who allow us access. The farm is surrounded by crown land, much of it swamp.  Monday, November 3rd was the opening of the season. The Saturday before Jason, Omer and I put out 800 lbs of apples by Jason’s stand at the edge of a patch of  the swampland. Last season Jason shot a 6 point buck in the first hour on the opening day of the season from his stand. Jason was not with Omer and me for the opening of this season. Omer sat in Jason’s stand–Omer has yet to shoot a deer so we want him to get one this season if possible–I sat in Fran’s (Jason’s wife) stand. Jason and Fran have a four month old daughter, Rose, at home so their hunting opportunities are limited this season. In their absence, Omer and I, with their blessing, sat in their stands. Omer and I were in our stands by 2:00 pm. We sat until the end of legal shooting time, half hour after sunset, and no deer were seen. We heard shooting from the surrounding crown land, so it looked like a good start to the season for some of the deer hunters in the area. Continue reading

Mad dogs and Englishmen

Opening day of duck season 2014 was unseasonably warm as the hot, humid weather Jason and I experienced on our recent grouse and woodcock hunt continued. I was up at 4:00 am, having breakfast before putting my shotgun, shells and cameras in the car and heading to meet Jason and his brother Maurice at Jason’s house. I stopped to have my thermos filled with Tim Horton’s coffee on the way and arrived 20 minutes early. We were on the road to the farm near Russell, Ontario, with Nos on board, planning to pass shoot ducks on the Castor River, by 5:00 am. It took us 30 minutes to drive there from Jason’s house. This was the first time since he and his wife Fran bought the house earlier in the year. It is good to know how long the drive is for future hunts.

We carried our shotguns and gear down to the spot at the river’s edge we set up to watch for the morning flight. Nos was champing at the bit. We had a little trouble getting our bearings at first. The walk to the river’s edge takes us through a corn field. The stalks are very tall this year. We found the spot soon enough and I set up the camcorders, so we could catch the action on video. As it happened, there was very little action. There were a few passing wood ducks early on and then nothing. We sat and watched the sunrise and observed the skies that were filled with Canada geese. We heard volleys of shots in the distance, so other groups of hunters were seeing action, presumably shooting at Canada geese heading to harvested bean and wheat fields. I shot at a couple of passing wood ducks, missing spectacularly. Jason and Maurice shot at a trio of passing ducks, missing spectacularly; that was the extent of our action for the morning.

It certainly was not the best opening day we experience, but we took it in stride. You will not get any ducks sitting at home and there is no guarantee when you take to the field that you bag any birds. We called it a hunt 2 hours into shooting time and packed up the gear. We stopped to chat with our host, Eric, before leaving. He told us the soybeans will not be harvested for another 2-3 weeks. We hope the harvest is completed sooner than later as we are eager to come back and gun for the abundant Canada geese.

As I got home earlier than I anticipated I thought I might as well take Hera out to the Marlborough Forest for a sweep of the cover at Lester’s Square. The fact that the temperature was 32 degrees C with the humidity was not lost on me; it is not the best weather, nor the time of day–late in the morning–to be taking a dog into the field. However, Hera was wound up as she was left at home when I went duck hunting, so off we went. On the drive into the forest I saw a turkey on the trail in front of us. The turkey hightailed it into the woods. We got to Lester’s Square and had it to ourselves. Before long as we made our way through the coverts, I was reminded of the popular song by Noël Coward with its refrain of “Mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun.” It was frightfully hot and humid. I made sure to bring Hera to the wetlands in the coverts so she could cool off. We completed the sweep by 1:00 pm. She bumped one woodcock in a patch of cover I expected to find birds. It was just too hot to be out.

On the drive out there was an incident. As I neared the end of the forest road where it meets Roger Stevens Drive, the road I take to get home, 3 people on trail bikes (a man, woman and child) came racing around a bend in the forest road. I braked and came to a stop so they could adjust their speed and pass, safely. Unfortunately, they were driving too fast, so when the man, who was in the lead, stopped, the child could not stop soon enough and rode into the side of the man’s trail bike, causing them both to fall over. The man got up and glared angrily at me, like it was my fault, then grabbed the child roughly. While the child was comforted by the woman, he picked up the downed trail bikes and gestured to me to move on. I continued on my way. I was afraid for a moment this situation would get uglier, but I kept calm and expressionless throughout. The forest is used by non-hunters as well as hunters, something that is not lost on me. When I am driving the forest roads I drive at 20 30 km/hour with my own safety and that of others in mind.

Five Canada geese in five shots

Nicolas1Nicolas2

One of the pleasures of hunting for me is when I can introduce a new hunter to the sport. I met Nicholas Marion in the summer of 2008 at a dog park where I took my new Brittany puppy Juno to play. Nicholas had a puppy of his own, a German Shorthaired Pointer named Cocotte. I struck up a conversation with him and learned he intended to hunt her, but had never trained a gun dog before and had virtually no experience in hunting. I offered to help him out with training Cocotte and introduce him to hunting. He happily accepted. I took Nick on his first waterfowl hunt, a field hunt for Canada geese, that season. How many hunters do you know of who limit out on Canada geese on their first hunt? Not only that, how many hunters do you know of who, on their first Canada goose hunt, bag five geese in five shots? Read on for  an account of the hunt. Continue reading

To hit is history. To miss is mystery. — Shirley E. Woods, Jr.

In a lifetime of shooting with shotguns I can safely say I am a fair wing shot on the target range and a good wing shot in the field. I consistently hit a fair number of clays on the skeet range, stations 3-5 give me the most difficulty and I do not bother with station 8 as for me is is just shooting the air full of holes. In the field, with my hunting buddies, I usually limit out on Canada geese in gunning over land and water. In the uplands I do very well gunning for woodcock, though this has a great deal to do with having an exceptional gun dog to find and point the birds for me. This sets me up for the shot and as woodcock are consistent in towering when flushed, always heading for the open sky, I usually find the mark, though often with a quick follow up shot with my Winchester 20 gauge side-by-side double barrelled gun. The reality is you are not going to hit every target you shoot at, be it a clay bird on the skeet range or a game bird in the field. I have racked up a great number of spectacular misses, both on the skeet range and in the field, over the years as my hunting buddies can attest. Missing when you are shooting with a shotgun comes with the territory, but therein lies the fun that comes from shotgunning. If you hit every target you would quickly grow tired of the sport. Continue reading

Geoffrey’s shotguns.

I am by no means a poor man, but I work for a living. I have a good job and together with Mika our combined incomes allow us to live comfortably. As nice as it would be to have my clothes tailored on Savile Row, and my shotguns custom designed by Churchill, Cogswell & Harrison and Purdey, I rather contentedly buy my clothes off the rack at Mark’s Work Wearhouse and my shotguns from retailers such as Sail and LeBaron Outdoor Products. My first shotgun was a Savage single shot, 16 gauge, hammerless, with a 2 3/4 chamber, a 28 inch barrel and full choke. It belonged to my father. I have a fleeting memory of the day he purchased it at a gun shop in Baltimore, Maryland in 1965. I was four years old at the time. I remember him talking to the proprietor of the gun shop, then the proprietor wrapping the shotgun in brown paper. My dad paid $49.00 for the gun. My dad enjoyed gunning for cottontail rabbits in the 1960s. He used this gun masterfully on his rabbit hunts with my uncle John in the countryside outside Kingston, Ontario. When I turned 14, my dad offered me the gun and I happily accepted it. Continue reading