Category Archives: Big game hunting

The problem with temptation is that you may not get another chance. ― Laurence Peter

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Savage Axis left-hand bolt action rifle in .270 Win.

The provincial government loosened the restrictions on retailers this week. I took the opportunity to drive out to Sail Ottawa to shop for some fishing supplies. I needed some size eight fish hooks, and some drop shot sinkers and a replacement spinning rod. Somehow I broke the tip off of one of my spinning rods, even though it was safely stored in a carrying case. I found the fish hooks and sinkers quickly enough. With the help of a sales associate, I found a replacement spinning rod that fit in my price range. “Mission accomplished,” I thought, but as I headed for the staircase to check out with my fishing supplies, I cast a glance to the hunting section and all the rifles and shotguns on display. “There is no harm in stopping to browse,” I mused. I made my way to the firearms counter and asked the associate behind the counter what he had in left-hand bolt action rifles. Continue reading

Give me better days and sunny ways.

 

 

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My dogs, Hera and Stella, out for their daily training run.

As if living under the lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic is not challenging enough, the news broke of mass murder in Nova Scotia. Details of the tragedy are being released as I write these words. In brief, the perpetrator is identified as a middle-aged man who had an obsession with the RCMP. He used a gun, the make and model not yet made public, and carried out his rampage disguised as an RCMP constable. The fact that several people are dead, including the attacker–he was killed in a shootout with genuine RCMP constables–is horrific. Sadly, with the lockdown in effect, the families, friends and acquaintances of the victims will be prevented from gathering to mourn and hold funeral services for them. It is a sad situation all around. That said, I am not going to dwell on the tragedy that took place in Nova Scotia.

 

 

The usual suspects wasted no time in blaming guns and white men for the crime. I will not mention individuals or groups by name, just as I will not mention the name of the perpetrator. I will turn a deaf ear to the abuse hurled at Canadian gun owners. I am writing these words to express my thoughts as a Canadian who has a lifelong passion for hunting and the shooting sports. I published several articles discussing what life is like for gun owners–what is right and wrong–in Canada. Yes, gun ownership for collecting, hunting and the shooting sports is an integral part of Canadian culture and heritage.

Along with writing about my life as a gun owner and hunter in Canada, I actively formed partnerships with many men and women over the years. I learned more about the game I hunt, where to find it. I took up raising and training gundogs. I tried out different makes and models rifles and shotguns in various calibres and gauges. I discovered that I like left-hand bolt-action rifles for big game hunting, double-barreled shotguns (over and under and side-by-side) for upland gunning and the Browning BPS pump-action shotgun for waterfowl hunting.

I am a seasoned hunter at this stage of my life and happily mentor younger and less experienced hunters who want to learn more about the sport. My forte is in upland gunning over my Brittanies Hera and Stella. I enjoy introducing new hunters to the pleasures of gunning for grouse and woodcock over pointing dogs. I published numerous articles on the blog detailing my hunting and fishing adventures. I posted videos of hunts on YouTube. I am not ashamed of my love of hunting and that I am a gun owner. I am not going to lose track of this because of a random atrocity. It has nothing to do with me as a gun owner and hunter. No, I am not going back into the closet as it were because of some people’s hatred of gun ownership and white men. I will stand up for myself as a gun owner and hunter as I look forward to new hunting adventures in the fields and marshes in the 2020 hunting seasons. I urge every gun owner and hunter who reads this to do the same as we look to better days.

Posted by Geoffrey

 

Every cloud has a silver lining

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Sighting in my new Remington Model 700 left-hand bolt action rifle in .270 Winchester.

“Be careful what you wish for, lest it comes true,” goes the adage. In deer season last year, I saw my hunting buddy Jason bag a six-point buck with his 1974 vintage Marlin 336 in 35 Rem lever-action rifle. It was an exciting hunt, and I was so impressed with how Jason handled his Marlin rifle, I decided I wanted the same rifle for myself for the next deer season. Jason agreed to search for a Marlin rifle for me, and he came through. He found me a 1960 Marlin 336 lever action in 30:30 in short order. Not long after, Jason found the right scope for my Marlin rifle: a Bausch and Lomb Elite 3000. Jason installed the scope on the rifle for me; he has the skill and experience for such delicate work. With the new rifle and scope assembled, I looked forward to getting it out to the range to try it out.

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My Marlin 336 lever action rifle in .30-30 rests on the bench at the rifle range.

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Hazard a deer hunter

 

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Mike ready to get to work on moving my deer stand.

 

I had a good day making ready for the upcoming upland game bird and whitetail deer seasons. My day started with me meeting my friend and hunting buddy Mike at the farm near Spencerville, where I hunt upland game birds and deer. The objectives today were to relocate my deer stand, check conditions at the farm for grouse and woodcock season, and to look for a sign that deer are moving in the area around the deer stands set up on the farm. I arrived at the farm at about 8:40 am. Mike arrived just after 9:00 am. Mike brought his chainsaw and the tools he needed to free my deer stand from the tree it is mounted on so that we could move the stand to its new location. Mike and I found a spot last season we thought offered a better view of the ridge in the wooded area I watch for deer. We marked the tree the previous season to which we intended to move my deer stand. We loaded Mike’s chainsaw and tools into the back of my Jeep and set out to check out the trail that leads to my deer stand. Continue reading

Remember, it’s a repeater!

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Hunting from my deer stand in the 2018 rifle season with my 30:06.

“Remember, it’s a repeater,” my hunting buddy Jason reminded me after an afternoon deer hunt. Jason, his wife Fran and myself were seated in our deer stands on the farm near Spencerville where we have permission to hunt deer. It was Saturday, November 10th, and I remember it was a blustery afternoon. The tree to which my ladder stand is attached rocked in the high winds as I sat and watched for a deer. At approximately 4:30 pm my chance came when a deer bounded into view directly in front of me. The deer stopped, partially hidden in the brush. I raised my rifle (a Browning X-bolt Medallion in 30:06, loaded with a 150-grain bullet), and found the deer in the crosshairs. The deer stepped forward, offering me a view of its vital areas. I tried to steady the rifle, then squeezed the trigger. After the shot, I watched to see if I found the mark. The deer sauntered back in the direction it came, offering a clear broadside view as it made its way back into the brush. I sat in my stand–like a deer caught in the headlights–watching as the deer went on its way. Continue reading

No doe tag, no problem

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Fran with the six point buck she shot on Remembrance Day 2017.

I took up whitetail deer hunting in earnest in 2011, and every following season I learn more about the sport and become more proficient as a deer hunter. I hunt with a “Gang of Four.” There are four of us in our cadre of deer hunters: myself, my friend and hunting buddy Omer and my friends and hunting buddies Jason and his wife, Fran. Jason is a seasoned deer hunter, and under his tutelage, I shot my first deer, a nice little doe, in the 2012 rifle season. One of the first things I learned from Jason is that you make certain to enter the antlerless deer draw every spring. Antlerless deer tags, or doe tags, are doled out by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources by lottery every year. The advantage of having a doe tag is that you are licensed to harvest any deer you see while hunting. Having a doe tag increases the odds you will bag a deer, so I make sure I enter the draw every year. I was disappointed when I was unsuccessful this season, so much so, I considered not hunting. Jason firmly reminded me that one does not get a deer sitting at home and not having a doe tag does not mean you will not see a buck. I heeded his words, but in the back of my mind remained pessimistic. As fortune proved, Jason got to tell me “I told you so.”

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No honour among thieves

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Jay examines where my trail camera was stolen.

This morning I set out with my friend and hunting buddy Jason Quinn to the farm outside Spencerville where we hunt deer. Our original plan was to bring our dogs and take them into the field after grouse and woodcock, then set about moving one of the deer stands, make adjustments to another and put more corn out as bait. We changed our plan because rain was forecast and decided to call off the upland hunt. We left the dogs at home and made our way to the farm, leaving Ottawa at 8:00 AM. We arranged to meet with one of our hunting buddies, Omer, and his friend Ehtisham at the farm as it was Omer’s stand that needed adjustment. Jason and I arrived before them as they stopped en route to pick up additional sacks of corn. Jason and I set out on Jason’s ATV with its trailer in tow laden with sacks of corn and the tools Jason needed for stand maintenance and relocation. We stopped by the new location for the stand slated for relocation and set out one of the sacks of corn. Then we moved on to my stand and when we arrived we were in for an unpleasant shock. Continue reading

Two birds with one stone

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Jason posing with a grouse he took on our morning hunt with Hera and Nos.

Got out today for an upland hunt with my friend Jason for the first time since his daughter Rose was born three years ago. I find my hunting buddies often have far less time for hunting once they become family men so it was great to get back in the field with Jason. I asked Jason the evening before if he would join me on a hunt for grouse and woodcock at the farm near Spencerville. He told me he had to be back by 1:00 pm as his wife Fran had plans. I reminded him that the it generally takes about two hours to sweep the grouse and woodcock cover on the farm so if we were in the field by 8:00 am we should have ample time for a morning hunt and get back to Ottawa in time. It is about an hour’s drive from Ottawa to the farm. Jason agreed to the plan and added that he wanted to bring the sacks of corn and mineral salt blocks along to set out by our deer stands and scout out a new location for his wife Fran’s ladder stand. We hunt deer on the farm during rifle season in November. This meant taking out his ATV so we could carry the sacks of corn and mineral salt blocks back into where our ladder stands are located. It was an ambitious agenda, but feasible if we timed it right. Continue reading

Welcome, Maggie Mae, to the thrill of grouse and woodcock hunting

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Mike and his German Shorthaired Pointer Maggie Mae on her first hunt of the 2017 season.

The heatwave continues as the small game and upland bird seasons get underway. It was Sunday morning, September 24, 2017, the day after the opening of duck season, and the temperature is expected to reach 40 C again. I arranged to meet with another of my new hunting buddies, Mike, who is training his first gun dog. He is the proud owner of a 17 month old German Shorthaired Pointer named Maggie Mae, Maggie being her working name. I met Mike last season while out running Hera and after chatting he and I became hunting buddies. Maggie was still a puppy last season, too young to join us in the field and not gun conditioned at that point. It was really too hot to stay out for very long with the dogs, but we thought we could at least introduce Maggie to Hera and let them get acquainted on a grouse hunt. Woodcock season opens on the 25th of September this season. The objective for this morning was to run the dogs together after grouse on the property near Spencerville where I also hunt deer with three friends. Mike is a seasoned deer hunter and I took the opportunity to show him the areas I hunt deer with my friends. We had a good, albeit brief, morning afield with the dogs on this all too hot day.

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Trial, error and a nine point buck in the bag

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My first white-tailed buck, a nine point, taken on opening afternoon of the 2016 rifle season in Eastern Ontario.

I never fully appreciated big game hunting until I shot my first white-tailed buck yesterday afternoon on the opening day of the 2016 rifle season here in Eastern Ontario. I took up big game hunting in earnest in 2011 under the tutelage of my good friend and hunting buddy Jason Quinn. Jay is an accomplished big game hunter with a lifetime of experience in the pursuit of white-tailed deer, moose and black bear. Under his guidance I shot my first white-tailed deer, a doe, in the 2012 rifle season. While killing my first deer was a thrill in its own right, the hunt I experienced yesterday was the culmination of all that is good in hunting: notably the challenges, camaraderie , effort, joys, sorrows and sportsmanship associated with hunting. The buck, my first, was hunted down and killed in a fair chase. I felled it using my Browning X-Bold Medallion bolt action rifle (left-hand) in 30-06 with a Winchester Super X 150 grain bullet. What this experience showed is I remain a novice deer hunter and with Jay as friend and mentor I am learning through trial and error.

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