Author Archives: geoffreyandmika

The problem with temptation is that you may not get another chance. ― Laurence Peter

Savage

Savage Axis left-hand bolt action rifle in .270 Win.

The provincial government loosened the restrictions on retailers this week. I took the opportunity to drive out to Sail Ottawa to shop for some fishing supplies. I needed some size eight fish hooks, and some drop shot sinkers and a replacement spinning rod. Somehow I broke the tip off of one of my spinning rods, even though it was safely stored in a carrying case. I found the fish hooks and sinkers quickly enough. With the help of a sales associate, I found a replacement spinning rod that fit in my price range. “Mission accomplished,” I thought, but as I headed for the staircase to check out with my fishing supplies, I cast a glance to the hunting section and all the rifles and shotguns on display. “There is no harm in stopping to browse,” I mused. I made my way to the firearms counter and asked the associate behind the counter what he had in left-hand bolt action rifles. Continue reading

Don’t threaten me, bucko!

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Stella taking a breather on her morning run with Hera.

Wild

Hera on point on a daily training run.

Raising and training hunting dogs is one of the joys I experience in life. Currently, I have two Brittanies; their names are Hera and Stella. Like the dogs who came before them, starting with Christie (my first dog) and followed by Maggie and Juno (all Brittanies), they are loved. I raise and train my dogs with a soft hand–Brittanies have sweet dispositions and are easy to train. I see that my dogs are well-trained and properly socialized. They are friendly and like meeting people and other dogs. My dogs, save for Maggie, lived to hunt–they are keen little huntresses. When I am out with my dogs, either hunting with them in the field or for their daily training runs between hunting seasons, I carefully observe the hunter safety protocols and do my best to leave a good impression with the people I meet. As a gun owner, hunter and dog owner, I am well aware of the need to maintain good relations with the public at large. By and large, my dogs and I go about our business without any trouble. Sadly, as hard as I try to live and let live when I am out with my dogs, there are times when I have run-ins with disagreeable people Continue reading

Give me better days and sunny ways.

 

 

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My dogs, Hera and Stella, out for their daily training run.

As if living under the lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic is not challenging enough, the news broke of mass murder in Nova Scotia. Details of the tragedy are being released as I write these words. In brief, the perpetrator is identified as a middle-aged man who had an obsession with the RCMP. He used a gun, the make and model not yet made public, and carried out his rampage disguised as an RCMP constable. The fact that several people are dead, including the attacker–he was killed in a shootout with genuine RCMP constables–is horrific. Sadly, with the lockdown in effect, the families, friends and acquaintances of the victims will be prevented from gathering to mourn and hold funeral services for them. It is a sad situation all around. That said, I am not going to dwell on the tragedy that took place in Nova Scotia.

 

 

The usual suspects wasted no time in blaming guns and white men for the crime. I will not mention individuals or groups by name, just as I will not mention the name of the perpetrator. I will turn a deaf ear to the abuse hurled at Canadian gun owners. I am writing these words to express my thoughts as a Canadian who has a lifelong passion for hunting and the shooting sports. I published several articles discussing what life is like for gun owners–what is right and wrong–in Canada. Yes, gun ownership for collecting, hunting and the shooting sports is an integral part of Canadian culture and heritage.

Along with writing about my life as a gun owner and hunter in Canada, I actively formed partnerships with many men and women over the years. I learned more about the game I hunt, where to find it. I took up raising and training gundogs. I tried out different makes and models rifles and shotguns in various calibres and gauges. I discovered that I like left-hand bolt-action rifles for big game hunting, double-barreled shotguns (over and under and side-by-side) for upland gunning and the Browning BPS pump-action shotgun for waterfowl hunting.

I am a seasoned hunter at this stage of my life and happily mentor younger and less experienced hunters who want to learn more about the sport. My forte is in upland gunning over my Brittanies Hera and Stella. I enjoy introducing new hunters to the pleasures of gunning for grouse and woodcock over pointing dogs. I published numerous articles on the blog detailing my hunting and fishing adventures. I posted videos of hunts on YouTube. I am not ashamed of my love of hunting and that I am a gun owner. I am not going to lose track of this because of a random atrocity. It has nothing to do with me as a gun owner and hunter. No, I am not going back into the closet as it were because of some people’s hatred of gun ownership and white men. I will stand up for myself as a gun owner and hunter as I look forward to new hunting adventures in the fields and marshes in the 2020 hunting seasons. I urge every gun owner and hunter who reads this to do the same as we look to better days.

Posted by Geoffrey

 

Young Winston

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Winston jigs for perch through the ice on the Ottawa River at Petrie Island.

I got out for some ice fishing last Wednesday afternoon on Crappie Bay on the Ottawa River at Petrie Island–it was February 5th. It was panfish I hoped to catch through the ice. Crappie Bay holds black crappie, bluegill, pumpkinseed and yellow perch. I brought wax worms for bait and an array of rods and reels fitted with bare hooks and tungsten jigs. I felt a little apprehensive as the memory of my last ice fishing expedition to Crappie Bay came to mind. It was a debacle! Everything that could possibly go wrong did. I will spare you the details as it is a long story, but trust me; the ice fishing expedition was a disaster. Also, I had the newly installed drill on my ice auger. I learned from my hunting buddy Mike that the previous drill I used is the wrong model. The old drill lacked the torque to power the auger to break through the ice adequately. With cautious optimism, I set out on the ice to see what fortune would bring.

Continue reading

James bags a brace of woodcock

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Posing with James and Stella after a day of woodcock hunting in the Marlborough Forest.

I got into the field this morning with my new hunting buddy James for our third hunt together this season. I brought both Hera and Stella for the hunt. Stella is six months old and coming along nicely in her training as a gun dog. Still, I had a sobering reminder that she is still a puppy on the hunt I had with her and Hera last Friday. Stella got a hold of two of the woodcock I shot over Hera and ate them. My best guess is that she does not understand yet that downed birds are not carrion. Neither does she get, however, that she is hunting for me. I decided on our hunt today to keep Stella under control when we had a bird down. She will not learn anything if I leave her crated at home. I met James in North Gower at 8:30 am, and he followed me in his car as I drove to Cowan’s Corner in the Marlborough Forest. We arrived at about 9:00 am and set out to see what fortune would bring. Continue reading

Every cloud has a silver lining

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Sighting in my new Remington Model 700 left-hand bolt action rifle in .270 Winchester.

“Be careful what you wish for, lest it comes true,” goes the adage. In deer season last year, I saw my hunting buddy Jason bag a six-point buck with his 1974 vintage Marlin 336 in 35 Rem lever-action rifle. It was an exciting hunt, and I was so impressed with how Jason handled his Marlin rifle, I decided I wanted the same rifle for myself for the next deer season. Jason agreed to search for a Marlin rifle for me, and he came through. He found me a 1960 Marlin 336 lever action in 30:30 in short order. Not long after, Jason found the right scope for my Marlin rifle: a Bausch and Lomb Elite 3000. Jason installed the scope on the rifle for me; he has the skill and experience for such delicate work. With the new rifle and scope assembled, I looked forward to getting it out to the range to try it out.

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My Marlin 336 lever action rifle in .30-30 rests on the bench at the rifle range.

Continue reading

Stella’s bad day

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The remains of the day.

It never ceases to amaze me as to how easily a train of good fortune can go off the rails without warning. Until this afternoon, my grouse and woodcock season went well–given the less than stellar conditions in the woodcock coverts. I got into birds every time I took to the field with Hera. James, a new hunting buddy, got a woodcock on his first hunt for woodcock over a gun dog. Stella is making progress in her training as a gun dog. She is not gun shy, and she is quartering through the wooded areas in the parkland where I take her and Hera for their daily training run. Initially, I thought Stella would not be old enough to accompany Hera and me in the field this season. However, I decided to bring her along on my last three hunts, as I am pleased with the progress she made to date. Everything seemed on track with Stella and her training; I could not be happier. What could go wrong? Continue reading