Monthly Archives: April 2019

All dressed with somewhere to go

 

Turkey

Jason poses with his first wild turkey taken on a morning hunt with the turkey taken by his friend Nick alongside.

Wild turkey hunting is something my hunting buddies and I want to take part in very much. I attended the seminar would be turkey hunters in Ontario are required to complete to get licensed several years ago. With a hunting buddy, I had at the time I travelled extensively in Eastern Ontario, knocking on doors in a futile effort to secure access to a property that held wild turkeys. The most common reasons given when we were refused access were that others already hunted the property or the landowner did not permit hunting. My enthusiasm for wild turkey hunting waned in the intervening years–though my current hunting buddies and I had access to the farmland where we deer hunt to hunt wild turkeys until recently. There are turkeys on the farm; I remember seeing turkeys while seated in my deer stand during deer season. Val, the owner of the farm and our gracious hostess, developed a sentimental attachment to the turkeys as they frequent her bird feeder. She asked that we do not hunt them and we respect her wishes. You could say, regarding turkey hunting, my buddies and I are “all dressed with nowhere to go.” However, fortune turned in our favour this season as one of our number, my buddy Jason, succeeded in bagging his first wild turkey in an exciting hunt Continue reading

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You look after your dog and I’ll look after mine

 

Wild

Hera on point during her daily training run.

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Husky pulling on the leash.

My morning run with Hera was interrupted when we had a second run-in with a priggish twat and her unruly husky. The winter before last Hera and I first ran up against this annoying woman and her husky. She keeps her dog leashed and it barks and pulls on the leash whenever it sees another dog. The first time I stood in the field across from a friend’s house with Hera while I waited on my friend and her dog to join us for a morning run. As the woman and her dog passed by on the road in front of my friend’s house the dog barked and pulled on the leash. Hera stood calmly by my side, taking no notice. The woman asked if I was not going to move on with my dog. I told her no that I was waiting for a friend. The woman complained her dog pulling on the leash aggravated a back injury she suffered. I told her I was sorry to hear that. She demanded that I leash Hera. I said to her to “just go.”

 

This morning Hera and I enjoyed a nice, long run as the weather is warm and sunny today. We walked with my friend Andrée and her poodle Oliver during the first part of the run. As Hera and I made a second pass in the meadow in front of Andrée’s house, I saw the woman and her husky in the distance. I did not know it was her at first–there is more than one husky owner in the area. Still, Hera and I chose a course I hoped would keep us from running into the woman and her dog. Unfortunately, we met up with her and the dog down by the river. The dog barked and pulled on the leash as before and the woman asked, more demanded, that I call my dog. She muttered about her sore back again then demanded that I leash Hera. I said to her calmly, “you look after your dog, and I’ll look after mine.” The woman took her dog in one direction and Hera, and I continued on our way.

I wonder where people like this woman get such an exaggerated sense of entitlement. I had run-ins with difficult people over the years when I am out with my dogs. Hera is my fourth Brittany, and I have a fifth Brittany (a new pup) coming in July. I learned over the years that it is better to keep calm while you stand your ground in dealing with people like the woman who confronted us this morning. Although I am better prepared for such confrontations these days, such encounters are still unpleasant and unwelcome. I hope Hera and I do not have a third meeting with this woman and her unruly dog.

Posted by Geoffrey